Nails in California’s economic coffin — ignoring reality.

Russ Steele

Joel Kotkin takes a look at Rick Perry’s influence on Texas’ economic success in an article that first appeared in Forbes. Link to the full article is here.

The part of Kotkin’s article that I found most interesting was the role of the energy sector in job Texas creation.  California is desperate to turn it’s growing unemployment around, but is unwilling to follow the Texas example.  Yes, Texas has benefited from higher energy prices, but in California the opposite it true, higher energy cost are reducing employment.  Companies are moving to Texas.

Kotkin writes:

To be sure, Texas has benefited from higher energy prices, as Perry’s detractors point out. According to an analysis by the EMSI economic forecasting group, the energy sector jumped from over 230,000 jobs in 2001 to just under 490,000 in 2011. That’s roughly 10% of all the state’s overall job gains. This parallels job growth in other states that have experienced surges in energy-related employment — such as North Dakota and Wyoming. 

But some of this has to do with making your own “luck.” Energy-rich California has all but declared war on its fossil fuel industry, once one of the nation’s most important. Instead, the state has placed lavish bets on renewable fuel and the much ballyhooed notion that “green jobs” could provide a massive base for new employment — something even the green-friendly New York Times has called “a pipe dream.” In fact, employment in this field has actually started to tick down, and the prospect of ever higher energy prices associated with “clean” fuels could prove another nail in California’s economic coffin.

What does all this have to do with the Next Grand Minimum? California is investing huge sums in “green energy” and “clean fuels” that are designed to reduce CO2, all to satisfy environmentalist who are trying to save the planet from global warming. Yet, the planet is not warming and we are spending billions that will be needed to deal with a decline in agriculture production,  resulting from shorter growing seasons as we enter The Next Grand Minimum. If California has a robust economy, we will be better prepared to deal with the problem created by cooling world. Drill baby dril!

I recommend that you read all to the Kotkin article here.

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When the cost of milk and bread goes up – Call CARB

Russ Steele

Every thing that we buy in the foothills is brought in by truck. The cost of that transportation is included in the cost of the products on our store shelves. Transportation companies do every thing they can to keep the cost of transportation down to stay competitive. But,  we can not say of the same of government agencies like the California Air Resources Board. Here is an example of CARB out of control, faking the data to save the planet.

The details are in a story by Michael Shaw, in the Capital Weekly: When writing regulations, make sure to consider all pertinent data.

Case in point is the Greenhouse Reduction Measure for Heavy-Duty Vehicles in the final steps with the California Air Resources Board (CARB). This regulation takes a great voluntary program, known as SmartWay, by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to promote best practices for heavy duty vehicle fuel efficiency and turns it into a $10.4 billion mandate. However, CARB’s estimate claims a net savings of more than $3 billion from greater fuel efficiency.

Continue reading “When the cost of milk and bread goes up – Call CARB”