Claim: Climate change ‘may’ be responsible for the abrupt collapse of Tibetan civilization around 2000BC

If we have another grand minimum and temperatures cool, farmers will have to adjust the crops that they grow. This is one example of how the climate has an impact on food supplies.

Watts Up With That?

From Washington State University: Closing the Case on an Ancient Archeological Mystery

Solving 4,000-year-old mystery helps WSU archeologist find useful resource for a warmer future

Barley cultivation in Jiuzhaigou National Park hasn't changed much in nearly 2,000 years. The park is located in the Min Shan mountain range, Northern Sichuan in South Western China. Credit: Washington State University Barley cultivation in Jiuzhaigou National Park hasn’t changed much in nearly 2,000 years. The park is located in the Min Shan mountain range, Northern Sichuan in South Western China. Credit: Washington State University

PULLMAN, Wash.–Climate change may be responsible for the abrupt collapse of civilization on the fringes of the Tibetan Plateau around 2000 B.C.

WSU archaeologist Jade D’Alpoim Guedes and an international team of researchers found that cooling global temperatures at the end of the Holocene Climatic Optimum, a 4,000 year period of warm weather, would have made it impossible for ancient people on the Tibetan Plateau to cultivate millet, their primary food source.

Guedes’ team’s research recently was published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Her results provide…

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Author: Russ Steele

Freelance writer and climate change blogger. Russ spent twenty years in the Air Force as a navigator specializing in electronics warfare and digital systems. After his service he was employed for sixteen years as concept developer for TRW, an aerospace and automotive company, and then was CEO of a non-profit Internet provider for 18 months. Russ's articles have appeared in Comstock's Business, Capitol Journal, Trailer Life, Monitoring Times, and Idaho Magazine.

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