Argentina – Serious frosts leads to agricultural emergency and disaster

Russ Steele

I have been watching for late spring frosts and early fall frosts in the Northern Hemisphere, but they occur in the Southern Hemisphere as well. Here is an example from  Ice Age Now:

Around citrus 2,000 growers have been affected by the frosts, which will impact 12,000 workers, said Entre Ríos governor Sergio Urribarri.

“We are committed to managing this both at the provincial level and before the national authorities with the measures necessary to partner with the sector, which is suffering from the consequences of an unheard of phenomenon for this time of year,” Urribarri was quoted as saying.

Frosts of -5°C (23°F) hit the departments of Feliciano, Federal, Federación, Concordia and Colón on Jun. 7, 8 and 9, registering a duration of 12 cold hours.

The story reported the frosts affected 50,000 hectares of citrus fruit including oranges and mandarins, as well as lemons and grapefruit to a lesser extent.

Entre Ríos Citrus Federation president Elvio Calgaro said the damage done by the frosts was “enormous,” and that on the affected land around 80% of crops were impacted by the weather event.

via Argentina – Serious frosts lead to declaration of agricultural emergency and disaster.

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Author: Russ Steele

Freelance writer and climate change blogger. Russ spent twenty years in the Air Force as a navigator specializing in electronics warfare and digital systems. After his service he was employed for sixteen years as concept developer for TRW, an aerospace and automotive company, and then was CEO of a non-profit Internet provider for 18 months. Russ's articles have appeared in Comstock's Business, Capitol Journal, Trailer Life, Monitoring Times, and Idaho Magazine.

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