On the Cusp of the Next Grand Minimum?

Russ Steele

Last week at a fund raising dinner I sat next to the owner of a local vineyard who explained why a shortage exists in one of his signature wines. It was due to two cold springs in a row, then followed up by a cool summer in 2011. Spring freezes in April and May killed some of his vines. The cool summer slowed the growth of sugar in the surviving grapes.

Now we learn up to 100% of this years apple crop in New York state have been destroyed by a late spring hard freeze.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BUFFALO NY

APR 29 2012

INCLUDING THE CITIES OF… NIAGARA FALLS… MEDINA… ROCHESTER… NEWARK… FAIR HAVEN… OSWEGO… WATERTOWN… LOWVILLE… BUFFALO… BATAVIA… WARSAW… GENESEO… CANANDAIGUA… JAMESTOWN… OLEAN… WELLSVILLE… ORCHARD PARK… SPRINGVILLE

HARD FREEZE WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 10 AM EDT THIS MORNING…

LOCATIONS…ALL OF WESTERN AND NORTH CENTRAL NEW YORK.

TV Interviews this morning with New York apple orchard owner indicated they have lost 100% of their crop.

These are stand alone events, but maybe early indicators of what is ahead.  The first indicators we are on the cusp of the next grand minimum will be shortening of the growing season, late spring frosts and early fall freezes.  We will be on the lookout for June killing frosts in America’s bread basket. Stay Tuned.

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About Russ Steele

Freelance writer and climate change blogger. Russ spent twenty years in the Air Force as a navigator specializing in electronics warfare and digital systems. After his service he was employed for sixteen years as concept developer for TRW, an aerospace and automotive company, and then was CEO of a non-profit Internet provider for 18 months. Russ's articles have appeared in Comstock's Business, Capitol Journal, Trailer Life, Monitoring Times, and Idaho Magazine.
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3 Responses to On the Cusp of the Next Grand Minimum?

  1. Champagne crop badly damaged by frost

    Temperatures dropped to – 3°C in the Côte des Blancs, while there was more widespread damage in the Côte des Bar as temperatures fell to – 5°C.

    The vines in the Côte des Bar to the south-east of Troyes, where Pinot Noir is planted, were hardest struck. Moët & Chandon winemaker Benoît Gouez said that the worst damage in the grands crus of Avize and Aÿ, where up to 18% has been damaged.

    Olivier Bonville of Franck Bonville, a grower based in Avize said, ‘Frost affected about 30% of our vineyard. After the warm temperatures in March the vines were already showing two leaves.

    And according to Arnaud Margaine, a grower with vineyards in Villers-Marmery, ‘We saw 15-20% of the vines damaged. But it is still too early to see the impact on the next harvest as some new buds may grow.’

    • ggoodknight says:

      E&J Gallo to the rescue, there will be plenty of Andre brand sparkling wine for any French oenophile needing bubbly in the future.

      Russ, if a grand minimum is to occur, I think the Canadian wheat harvest would be the grain “canary in the mineshaft”.

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