On the Cusp: Is this what global cooling looks like? (Updated)

Remember it is only weather for now. The question is this an indicator for the rest of the winter?

Here is an update:

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About Russ Steele

Freelance writer and climate change blogger. Russ spent twenty years in the Air Force as a navigator specializing in electronics warfare and digital systems. After his service he was employed for sixteen years as concept developer for TRW, an aerospace and automotive company, and then was CEO of a non-profit Internet provider for 18 months. Russ's articles have appeared in Comstock's Business, Capitol Journal, Trailer Life, Monitoring Times, and Idaho Magazine.
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3 Responses to On the Cusp: Is this what global cooling looks like? (Updated)

  1. Sean says:

    I don’t think the story of climate change, natural or anthraprogenic, can be adequately revealed in averages. Think about this year. Much of the country had a warm winter and early spring, then the northeast and Great Lakes region got hit with a spell of very cold weather, reeking havoc on budding fruit trees, this was followed by a hot summer and now a cold early fall cutting short the growing season. The damage done to crop yields with such gyrations belie what the averages will tell you. I think these kind of swings might tell us why solar cycle related climate change was more easily observed in crop prices rather than in weather records.

    • Russ says:

      Sean,

      Agree. Crop prices are the best indicator for major climate changes. It was the cycle of gain prices that led to an investigation of sunspot cycles. I am following the early fall frost and late spring frosts at the Next Grand Minimum. They determine the length of the growing season. As the season grows shorter, the food supply is diminished. As the growing season grows shorter the quality of the grapes decline and wine quality drops. Climate change takes place over 30 years, but the evidence of the changes show up in our crops.

      • Sean says:

        One confounding factor on crop prices is globalization and low cost transportation. Even though apple orchards were hit very hard in the great lakes region, the Washington state apple crop is the second largest ever. It’s so large they can’t get enough farm workers to pick it.

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