On the Cusp: Only Six Days of Summer in Sweden in 2012

Russ Steele

“Summer weather was miserable – now there’s proof,” says this article out of Sweden.

According to the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), on only six days this summer did the temperature reach more than 25 degrees Celsius in Stockholm.

Last year, Stockholm had 28 days with summer weather, ie days with a minimum temperature of 25 degrees. This year, just six days met this definition – 4 days in July and two in August. Recent summers have not even come close to having as few summer days.

Gothenburg had only five summer days this year. Malmo had nine, about as few as last year.

There has also been an unusual amount of rain, says Lisa Frost, meteorologist at SMHI.

The month of June was the wettest ever recorded in Stockholm, where precipitation has been measured since 1786.

Between June 1 and August 19 Stockholm had 41 days of rain, meaning that it rained more than every other day.

Hinshult in eastern Smayland got 163 mm of rain on July 7, the fifth largest daily amount ever reported by an official Swedish station.

SMHI still maintains that this year’s summer was relatively normal, but keep in mind that weather authorities often smooth out temperature variations by including nighttime readings. Even with this smoothing, July’s average temperature in Stockholm stood at at 17.8 degrees, which is 2.9 degrees less than in July 2011.

See entire article:
http://www.dn.se/nyheter/sverige/somamrens-resultat-bara-sex-dagar-med-hogsommarvarme

H/T to Ice Age Now for the tip!

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About Russ Steele

Freelance writer and climate change blogger. Russ spent twenty years in the Air Force as a navigator specializing in electronics warfare and digital systems. After his service he was employed for sixteen years as concept developer for TRW, an aerospace and automotive company, and then was CEO of a non-profit Internet provider for 18 months. Russ's articles have appeared in Comstock's Business, Capitol Journal, Trailer Life, Monitoring Times, and Idaho Magazine.
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